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SuperLux launches to London’s lighting designers

Key contributors at the SuperLux London launch party: from left, Tony Rimmer (Studio-29), Davina Jackson (SuperLux editor), Tony Browne (Fagerhult MD), Joe Catchpole (projections), Melissa Woolford and Meneesha Kellay (Museum of Architecture), Calum McConnachie (ING PR). (Vicenzo Giordano)

Key contributors at the SuperLux London launch party: from left, Tony Rimmer (Studio-29), Davina Jackson (SuperLux editor), Tony Browne (Fagerhult MD), Joe Catchpole (projections), Melissa Woolford and Meneesha Kellay (Museum of Architecture), Calum McConnachie (ING PR). (Vincenzo Giordano)

Around 300  London designers last week celebrated the ‘smart light cities’ phenomenon at two SuperLux book promotion events hosted by Fagerhult – global lighting producers from Sweden – at their new premises in the newly dynamic precinct of Southwark.

Fans of Melissa Woolford's Museum of Architecture cultural promotions agency, at the SuperLux launch. (Vicenzo Giordano)

Fans of Melissa Woolford’s Museum of Architecture cultural promotions agency, at the SuperLux launch. (Vincenzo Giordano)

Organised by the Museum of Architecture (MoA) and ING promotions agencies with support from book publishers Thames and Hudson, the two SuperLux events were enlivened by talks from urban light art experts and videos from the 2015 SuperLux exhibition at the City of Sydney’s Customs House.

On Monday 11 April, about 60 designers attended the SuperLux edition of MoA’s regular Book Club discussion series – this time chaired by Paul James, editor of the leading lighting magazines MondoArc and darc. Speakers were SuperLux editor Davina Jackson and essayist/transmedia artist Dr Vesna Petresin, London architect Alex Haw of Atmos Studio and Kate Harvey, a producer with the Artichoke light art festivals and events agency. The talks were introduced by MoA’s director, Melissa Woolford, and Fagerhult Light’s UK managing director, Tony Browne.

Several evenings later, on Thursday 14 April, about 250 designers mingled in the Fagerhult courtyard to scoff British fish-n-chips and watch videos of lightworks from the SuperLux book on large screens and wall projections.